I forgot to tell anyone

Dale Duncan is doing a weekly update about us in the Toronto Globe and Mail. Here’s today’s.

TRASH TALK

ZERO HOUR IN THE BATHROOM

Introducing Globe Toronto’s weekly look at Sarah McGaughey and Kyle Glover, a Toronto couple working to generate zero garbage in 2007.

Composting is painless when it comes to potato peels, but there are some natural substances you don’t want hanging around your apartment. Take ear wax. To avoid sending Q-Tips to the landfill, Ms. McGaughey buys biodegradable ear cleaners, which are made of tightly wound cardboard instead of plastic. Even these are off limits in Toronto green bins, however, so Ms. McGaughey cuts them up into small pieces (to aid biodegradation) and puts them in the compost. “If I’m really on the ball, I unwind the paper,” she says.

In preparing for a trash-free bathroom, neither Ms. McGaughey nor Mr. Glover was willing to switch to a straight razor, which can be sharpened again and again. “I’m too accident-prone for that,” Ms. McGaughey says. Instead, Mr. Glover purchased an electric razor, and Ms. McGaughey is using a razor with a changeable blade, stretching out its use as long as she can.

They are, however, trying to make their own toothpaste — er, toothpowder: three parts baking soda, one part salt. Their toilet paper comes in recycled paper packaging, which the couple will reuse as wrapping paper.

Print Edition – Section Front

Section M Front  Enlarge Image

The Globe and Mail

“We had friends who tried no toilet paper once,” Ms. McGaughey says. (Apparently, other options include rags and using a squeeze bottle to spray yourself with water.) “They made it four days before giving up.”

And if someone gets a boo-boo? “We’ll try not to cut ourselves,” Ms. McGaughey says.

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2 Comments

Filed under personal care, press

2 responses to “I forgot to tell anyone

  1. Laurie

    Re: Hair in the compost

    I have never had a problem with hair clippings in the compost….if they are cut small, they don’t interfere with the rest of the decomposition and add bulk and fibre to the finished compost, which is just as good a soil additive as peat moss or other organics that do not decompose. I even put my dog’s hair clippings into the bin.

  2. WOW! Really! Thanks so much Laurie! You have solved one of our problems!

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